#getfit


Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014
Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014
Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014
Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014

Fitness Tips & Trends

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Meet Heath Ferry, our newest brand ambassador! Heath ran out of necessity while serving in the Army during the Gulf War and later in Afghanistan, but had to stop due to various injuries.

When suddenly falling on hard times “My wife was diagnosed with lung cancer that was found "by accident" and was undergoing chemo and radiation in late 2013-early 2014. My father was diagnosed with cancer and died a few months later. Right after All of that, our house was almost destroyed by a major water leak that did $30,000 or so worth of damage.”, Heath decided, on a whim, to participate in his local church’s 5k training program as a way to get into better shape both physically and mentally. That program jump started a new passion for outdoor exercise and in the past year alone, Heath and run over 500 miles and cycled almost 1500. “I had good shoes, but I needed better support for my feet and legs. That’s where Thirty48 came in” We’ll be following Heath on his training journey and supporting him through his races so look out for future updates!

 width=

Meet Heath Ferry, our newest brand ambassador! Heath ran out of necessity while serving in the Army during the Gulf War and later in Afghanistan, but had to stop due to various injuries.

When suddenly falling on hard times “My wife was diagnosed with lung cancer that was found "by accident" and was undergoing chemo and radiation in late 2013-early 2014. My father was diagnosed with cancer and died a few months later. Right after All of that, our house was almost destroyed by a major water leak that did $30,000 or so worth of damage.”, Heath decided, on a whim, to participate in his local church’s 5k training program as a way to get into better shape both physically and mentally. That program jump started a new passion for outdoor exercise and in the past year alone, Heath and run over 500 miles and cycled almost 1500. “I had good shoes, but I needed better support for my feet and legs. That’s where Thirty48 came in” We’ll be following Heath on his training journey and supporting him through his races so look out for future updates!

trianthlon compression sleeve

Whether you’re training for a triathlon, a Spartan race or a local 5k for your favorite charity, training for a race...

Whether you’re training for a triathlon, a Spartan race or a local 5k for your favorite charity, training for a race, even your first one ever, is not difficult if you use some of the simple strategies below.

1. Do flexibility training. Considered one of the three pillars of fitness, flexibility training is the most often overlooked. The more flexible you are, the better your performance will be in any sort of athletic competition. Flexibility training also reduces your risk of injury and minimizes recovery time so you can train again as soon as possible.

2. Warm up properly. Make sure you do a full, dynamic workout the day of the race, as well as your full stretching routine. Rock compression sleeves and socks to help keep those muscles warm all the way until moment the race starts. 

3. Lights out. Strive to get adequate sleep while you’re training for a race, especially the night before. When you sleep, your body goes into an anabolic state that's optimal for building lean muscle and boosting your overall performance. Aim to get seven to nine hours of sleep per night.

4. Buddy up or train with a group. Often times, training with a partner or in a group environment can get you in a more competitive mode. Training with someone else makes you more accountable and naturally instils a competitive element. You may also want to have a certified trainer help design some workouts for you so that you’re training in the most efficient manner possible. You know what they say—train smart!

5. Get the right gear. Make sure you get the best running shoes for your feet. It’s best to go to a specialty running store where an expert can assess your gait and custom fit your shoe based on what which features will give you the best support. Invest in some good running socks and compression sleeves as well, to boost blood circulation and draw moisture away from your skin to keep your feet and legs cooler during your race.

image: westlimerickleisure.com

trianthlon compression sleeve

Whether you’re training for a triathlon, a Spartan race or a local 5k for your favorite charity, training for a race...

Whether you’re training for a triathlon, a Spartan race or a local 5k for your favorite charity, training for a race, even your first one ever, is not difficult if you use some of the simple strategies below.

1. Do flexibility training. Considered one of the three pillars of fitness, flexibility training is the most often overlooked. The more flexible you are, the better your performance will be in any sort of athletic competition. Flexibility training also reduces your risk of injury and minimizes recovery time so you can train again as soon as possible.

2. Warm up properly. Make sure you do a full, dynamic workout the day of the race, as well as your full stretching routine. Rock compression sleeves and socks to help keep those muscles warm all the way until moment the race starts. 

3. Lights out. Strive to get adequate sleep while you’re training for a race, especially the night before. When you sleep, your body goes into an anabolic state that's optimal for building lean muscle and boosting your overall performance. Aim to get seven to nine hours of sleep per night.

4. Buddy up or train with a group. Often times, training with a partner or in a group environment can get you in a more competitive mode. Training with someone else makes you more accountable and naturally instils a competitive element. You may also want to have a certified trainer help design some workouts for you so that you’re training in the most efficient manner possible. You know what they say—train smart!

5. Get the right gear. Make sure you get the best running shoes for your feet. It’s best to go to a specialty running store where an expert can assess your gait and custom fit your shoe based on what which features will give you the best support. Invest in some good running socks and compression sleeves as well, to boost blood circulation and draw moisture away from your skin to keep your feet and legs cooler during your race.

image: westlimerickleisure.com

sweating in running socks

Whether you live in the desert or another part of the country, when temperatures are hot, it can be difficult to work out.

Whether you live in the desert or another part of the country, when temperatures are hot, it can be difficult to work out. High temperatures can make your exercise uncomfortable or even dangerous, as there are risks of dehydration and serious health issues. When you work out in the heat, your body circulates blood to the skin to cool it down. The danger here is that your system is transporting the blood away from your muscles and reducing the amount of blood your heart pumps. This can increase your blood pressure to a point where you have to stop exercising.

Whether you’re training for a marathon or are a weekend warrior, consistency is important when it comes to workouts—the effects of training are quickly lost when you stop. Instead of letting hot temperatures put a wrench in your workout regimen, try these tips for keeping cool when you’re working out in the heat.

1. Hydrate like crazy

. It’s essential to hydrate before, during and after your workout. You've got to maintain the salt-water balance in your body by drinking plenty of fluids, preferably cold water. It's also safe to drink a sports beverage with electrolytes, but avoid caffeinated beverages altogether during exercise. Dehydration is one of the most common problems for people who work out in hotter climates, so be sure to protect yourself.

2. Protect your skin

The sun’s harmful rays can do some serious damage, even when it’s cloudy. Protect your skin from a sunburn with an oil-free sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher. Oil-free is key because it won’t interfere with your body’s ability to cool down, unlike some oilier versions. You should also wear sunglasses and a lightweight, breathable hat to protect your eyes and delicate scalp, while keeping you cooler overall.

3. Wear lightweight, breathable gear

While you typically want to wear minimal amounts of clothing to keep things cool, like shorts, a tank top and running socks, you can choose gear that helps prevent overheating. Opt for light-colored, moisture wicking fabrics that transport sweat away from your skin so that your cooling system functions properly and Thirty48’s running socks, which are made with COOLMAX® Fabric, which will also move moisture away from your skin so that your feet can breathe.

Image: blog.doctoroz.com

sweating in running socks

Whether you live in the desert or another part of the country, when temperatures are hot, it can be difficult to work out.

Whether you live in the desert or another part of the country, when temperatures are hot, it can be difficult to work out. High temperatures can make your exercise uncomfortable or even dangerous, as there are risks of dehydration and serious health issues. When you work out in the heat, your body circulates blood to the skin to cool it down. The danger here is that your system is transporting the blood away from your muscles and reducing the amount of blood your heart pumps. This can increase your blood pressure to a point where you have to stop exercising.

Whether you’re training for a marathon or are a weekend warrior, consistency is important when it comes to workouts—the effects of training are quickly lost when you stop. Instead of letting hot temperatures put a wrench in your workout regimen, try these tips for keeping cool when you’re working out in the heat.

1. Hydrate like crazy

. It’s essential to hydrate before, during and after your workout. You've got to maintain the salt-water balance in your body by drinking plenty of fluids, preferably cold water. It's also safe to drink a sports beverage with electrolytes, but avoid caffeinated beverages altogether during exercise. Dehydration is one of the most common problems for people who work out in hotter climates, so be sure to protect yourself.

2. Protect your skin

The sun’s harmful rays can do some serious damage, even when it’s cloudy. Protect your skin from a sunburn with an oil-free sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher. Oil-free is key because it won’t interfere with your body’s ability to cool down, unlike some oilier versions. You should also wear sunglasses and a lightweight, breathable hat to protect your eyes and delicate scalp, while keeping you cooler overall.

3. Wear lightweight, breathable gear

While you typically want to wear minimal amounts of clothing to keep things cool, like shorts, a tank top and running socks, you can choose gear that helps prevent overheating. Opt for light-colored, moisture wicking fabrics that transport sweat away from your skin so that your cooling system functions properly and Thirty48’s running socks, which are made with COOLMAX® Fabric, which will also move moisture away from your skin so that your feet can breathe.

Image: blog.doctoroz.com


 

MEDIA + BUZZ

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Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014
It’s officially summer, which means tanned bodies, sweaty workouts, READ MORE > READ MORE >
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I like things that are designed to work for a specific need. READ MORE > READ MORE >

#3 Overall Ranked Compression Sleeves!

Rock Creek Runner | The Trail Runner’s Gear Guide: Summer 2014
It’s officially summer, which means tanned bodies, sweaty workouts, READ MORE >

Epic Bicycle World | Thirty 48 - A Cycling Sock Review
I like things that are designed to work for a specific need. READ MORE >

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Sometimes the little things count for a lot. Yes, cycling comfort starts with a bike fit... READ MORE >